Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Life Pre-Intermediate Textbook: 1E Medical Advice Online p.17

(Supplemental Materials for Specific Textbooks--Life Pre-Intermediate)


Lead-in (docs, pub)--lead in questions taken from here

Are you a member of a health spa or gym?

Are you healthy?

Do you always eat healthy food? What sort of food do you eat?

Do you catch a cold more than once a year?

Do you eat a lot of vegetables?

Do you eat lots of fruit?

Do you ever get headaches?

Do you exercise? What kind of exercise do you do? How often do you exercise?

Do you go for regular medical check-ups?

Do you go to the dentist's twice a year?

Do you have a lot of stress?

Do you know anyone who suffers from backaches?

Do you often eat fast food?

Do you take medicine when you are sick?

Do you usually get enough sleep?

Have you ever broken a bone?

Have you ever donated blood?

How can you reduce stress in your life?

How often do you get sick in one year?

How often do you go to the doctor's?

How would you recommend treating a cold?


Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Life Intermediate: 2F Taiko Master p.30-31

(Supplemental Materials for Specific Textbooks--Life Intermediate)


Lead-in (docs, pub) lead-in questions from here.
Transcript (docs, pub)
Vocabulary Cards (docs, pub)

What kind of music do you like?

Are you a good singer?

Can you concentrate on other things when you are listening to music?

Can you play a musical instrument?
If so, what do you play?
How long have you been playing?
Are you good at it?

Can you read music?

Do you enjoy music videos?

Do you have an expensive stereo system?

Do you like singing karaoke?
How often do you sing karaoke?

Do you like to dance?

Do you listen to music while doing your homework?

Do you sing while taking a bath?

Do you watch music shows on TV? If so, what do you watch?

Have you ever been to a concert?
Have you ever been to a rock concert?
Have you ever been to an orchestra concert?

Have you ever taken part in a singing competition?

How many CD's do you have?

How much time do you spend listening to music every day?

If you could play any musical instrument, what would it be and why?

If you could start a band, what type of music would you play? Why?

Is there any kind of music that you hate?

What are some special or traditional musical instruments in your country?

What is one of your favorite songs? Why do you like it? When did you first hear it? Who sings it?

Two thousand years ago, Japanese warriors used drums to make their enemies fear them. People used to mark village boundaries by how far the sounds of drums travelled.
They even used to do their daily activities to the beat of drums.
Slowly over the years, the sound of the drums went away--until now.
Now, far from Japan in the United States, a new audience is listening to this ancient drum.  The art is called “taiko” and it has come from the villages of Japan to the city of San Francisco.

Sarita: The essence of Taiko is that it’s not just people drumming.  It’s the unity of the drummers amongst themselves.

In San Francisco, the movement of the body has now been added to traditional taiko drumming.  It’s now an art form that brings together sound, body and mind.  During a performance, the energy of all of these parts goes into the beating of the drums.

Seiichi Tanaka: Your self and the drum, totally get together. Into the drum … your self … and drum come to you… both mutual

In the early 1900s, traditional taiko drumming was popular in Japanese-American communities. But, by the mid 1900s, people were losing interest. Then, in 1968, Seiichi Tanaka arrived and brought a new interest and a new style of drumming.

Seiichi Tanaka: I was just fresh off the boat. So a whole bunch of “fresh off the boat” people get together and play drums.

Leigh: Tanaka Seiichi is a real pioneer.  He’s made a dozen or so groups back in the sixties and seventies into something like 800 groups now spread all over this country and Canada.

Seiichi Tanaka: All energy from the Mother Nature through your body, come to my body--here… go through, to the drumstick… BHAM!

Taiko drummers sometimes have to play through pain and tiredness while practising and performing.
At that point, some drummers feel that they can really express their feelings and energy.

Leigh: It’s almost as if you are standing outside of your body kind of looking in.  And you hit this point where you’re just completely free.

Sarita: The essence of Taiko is giving your 110 per cent. You have to always give, because if you don’t give and everyone else is giving, then you’re draining from them.

Here in San Francisco, taiko came from the old world of Japan and was born again. Grand Master Seiichi Tanaka is giving North America the chance to enjoy the energy and excitement of traditional taiko drumming.


audience
bring together
beat
drum
beat
drum
boundary
drummer
community
drumstick
drain
essence
fear
performance
pioneer
unity
warrior





Monday, December 05, 2016

Life Pre-Intermediate Textbook: 1D At the Doctor's Page 16

(Supplemental Materials for Specific Textbooks--Life Pre-Intermediate)


Transcript: docs, pub
Doraemon PowerPoint game for backs to the board: drive, slides, pub


as well

normal

painful

see

temperature
usual, ordinary, and expected

causing physical pain

to meet or visit someone

also

how hot or cold someone's body is

Conversation 1

C: Hello. I’ve got a sore throat and a runny nose.  I feel terrible.
P: Have you got a temperature (1)_______________?
C: No, it’s (2)_______________.
P: Well, you should take this medicine twice a day. It’s good for a sore throat.
C: Thanks.
P: And try drinking hot water with honey and lemon.  That helps.
C: OK. I will.
P: Oh, and you need a box of tissues.  If you still feel ill in a few days, (3)_______________ a doctor.

Conversation 2

P: I’ve got an earache in this ear. I couldn’t sleep last night because it was so (4)_______________.
D: Let me have a look. … ah … yes, it’s very red in there.  What about the other one.
P: It feels fine.
D: Hmmm.  It’s a bit red as well.  Do you feel sick at all?
P: No, not really.
D: Let me check your (5)_______________. … Yes, it’s higher than normal.  I’ll give you something for it. You need to take one of these pills twice a day for seven days.  Drink lots of water and come back if you don’t feel better.
Answers:

Conversation 1

C: Hello. I’ve got a sore throat and a runny nose.  I feel terrible.
P: Have you got a temperature (1)as well?
C: No, it’s (2)normal.
P: Well, you should take this medicine twice a day. It’s good for a sore throat.
C: Thanks.
P: And try drinking hot water with honey and lemon.  That helps.
C: OK. I will.
P: Oh, and you need a box of tissues.  If you still feel ill in a few days, (3)see a doctor.

Conversation 2

P: I’ve got an earache in this ear. I couldn’t sleep last night because it was so (4)painful.
D: Let me have a look. … ah … yes, it’s very red in there.  What about the other one.
P: It feels fine.
D: Hmmm.  It’s a bit red as well.  Do you feel sick at all?
P: No, not really.
D: Let me check your (5)temperature. … Yes, it’s higher than normal.  I’ll give you something for it. You need to take one of these pills twice a day for seven days.  Drink lots of water and come back if you don’t feel better.



Review of Westworld Season 1

(Television Addiction)

So, along with the rest of the world, I've been through the wild ride that was season 1 of Westworld.

I suspect my experience has been similar to the rest of you.  But let me test that theory.  I'll jot down a summary of my experiences, and you tell me if it was the same for you or not.

Before the Show
I never saw the original 1973 Westworld, but I'd seen commercials for it when it was being re-run on TNT back in the day, and I knew enough of the basic premise.

So naturally my first thought was: They're going to make a whole show based on this? 

I mean, sure, you could get a solid 2 hours out of robots running amok in a theme park.  But a whole show?  A whole 5 seasons on this premise?  How could this possibly be any good?

But in the weeks leading up to Westworld's premire, I noticed it was getting a lot of hype.

I have HBO in my apartment as part of my cable package here, and so, since I had nothing better to do, I decided to check out the first episode just to see what the fuss was about.

And then, once you've watched the first episode, you're hooked.  (I have yet to meet anyone who saw the first episode, and didn't stay through the rest of the season.)

It was hard to tell if the show was good or bad, but it was very intriguing.  There were a number of interesting possibilities being shown, and you wanted to keep watching to see where those possibilities go.

By about episode 4, however, I was beginning to think that the show was losing its initial promise.  The plot wasn't going anywhere.  It was just mystery being piled on mystery, with no forward momentum to the story.

And then, on episode 7, things actually started to happen again.  And I was fascinated by the show all over again.

"Truly, we are living in a golden age of TV," I tweeted at the time.




I was very enthusiastic about this show for about a week.  I was having energetic conversations at work, and became that guy who was telling everyone "You have to watch this show.  What do you mean you're not watching it?  You're wasting your life.  This is the best show ever."

But then, just when I was convinced that the story was finally moving forward, episode 8 reverted back.  Episode 8 was yet another episode that just teased the mystery without moving the story forward, and I lost all my enthusiasm.

By episode 9, a lot of the mysteries were getting answers.

Some people on the Internet were angry at how predictable the answers actually were once we got them.  But I agree with this article (courtesy of Whisky Prajer) that predictability is not necessarily a bad thing.
In order for the mysteries to have a satisfying resolution, their solutions have to fit in naturally with the story.  Clues should be laid out ahead of time, and the audience should at least be given the opportunity to try to guess things before the answer is revealed.
Plot twists that come out of nowhere, and have not been built up at all, are cheating.

So, in my opinion, fair play to Westworld for having plot twists that some people saw coming.  That's how the game should be played.

I did find, however, that once a lot of the mysteries of the show had been revealed, my interest in the show started to drop.
The problem is that the show had been built all around mysteries, and once  those mysteries were resolved, I started to question whether I had any interest in the plot or the characters.

But the season finale got my attention back again.
I'm not sure the plot of the show is all that great (we'll have to see where they will go with this) but the style of the show--the acting, the directing, the atmosphere--is all top notch.  You feel like you're watching something really important.

Apparently season 2 won't be out until 2018, so we've got a nice long break ahead of us.  But when season 2 does return, I imagine curiosity will bring me back

************************************************

By the way, I know I'm not the first person to make this observation, but for what it's worth, I stand by my previous tweet.
Truly, we are living in a golden age of TV,

This is especially true for those of us  who grew up in the 1980s, when television was just brainless garbage.

We can debate whether or  not Westworld is as good a show as it could be.  Or whether or not it truly lives up to its potential.  But there's no debate that TV shows with this much ambition never existed back in our childhood.

*************************************************

Freddie deBoer recently tweeted:




My impression is that the idea that television has "passed by" movies (or whatever) in terms of quality stems from uneven playing field. That is, movies get watched in whole at once, but TV shows get judged based on their promise, pedigree, initial good will, etc. But the basic condition of prestige TV is people gradually realizing a show isn't as good as they thought or isn't good at all.One of the most entertaining dynamics on social media is watching people slowly come to the communal realization that a show isn't good. But the halo effect of initial promise, high-profile creators, and general "prestige" effect inflates perceptions of overall quality of TV. Meanwhile a movie's a movie: it's as good or as bad as it is and you know in 2 hours.the Killing is the canonical example. The Night Of to a lesser extent. Perhaps Westworld right now.

This is completely true.  But perhaps that's the beauty of TV as much as it is a weakness.
The initial premise of a story is often much more interesting than the actual story.  The fact that TV gives us so much time to think about the initial premise, and all its possibilities, usually means that by the time the conclusion finally comes, it inevitability fails to live up to our imagination.
That's the downside.
The upside is, we get to spend weeks imagining all the possibilities of the premise before the disappointing conclusion finally comes.

Link of the Day
Noam Chomsky 2016 | Ecconomic - Dollar Collapse Graduate Masterclass Professor Noam Chomsky

Sunday, December 04, 2016

So, Huckleberry Finn is in the news once again.

Washington Post article here:

A Virginia school district has pulled copies of “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” from classrooms and libraries while it weighs whether it should permanently ban the American classics because of the books’ use of racial slurs.
 In response to a formal complaint from a parent, Accomack County Public Schools Superintendent Chris Holland said the district has appointed a committee to recommend whether the books should remain in the curriculum and stay in school libraries. District policy calls for the formation of the committee — which can include a principal, teachers and parents — when a parent formally files a complaint.
I can understand taking the book out of the school curriculum, but I can't understand taking it out of the school libraries.

Surely there's got to be a middle ground between: "this book is mandatory reading for students" and "we're going to take this book out of the school library to prevent students from even having access to it."

In The Once and Future King, T.H. White described totalitarianism as "Everything which is not forbidden is compulsory."
The Virginia school disctrict seems to me to be operating on the inverse principle: "Everything not compulsory is forbidden."  One minute the book is compulsory reading for students, the next minute it's forbidden.

In my own review of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, I said the following:

As for the censorship issue:
I'm anti-censorship in general, but of course it's important to acknowledge there are all different shades of grey between mandating that a book be read, and out-right banning it completely.
It's one thing for The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to be part of the mandatory school curriculum, and another thing for the book to be taken off of the mandatory curriculum but still usable at the teacher's discretion.  And another thing yet for the book to be outright forbidden in the classroom.  And yet another thing for the book to be removed from the school library.  And yet another thing for the book to be removed from the public library.

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Movie worksheets: Just the Links

(Movie Worksheets)

Link to Folder on Google Drive HERE

Slideshow Presentations on Google Slides
Part 1 (slidespub), Part 2 (slidespub), Part 3 (slidespub), Part 4 (slidespub), Part 5 (slidespub), Part 6 (slidespub), Part 7 (slidespub), Part 8 (slidespub), Part 9 (slidespub), Part 10 (slidespub), Part 11 (slidespub), Part 12 (slidespub), Part 13 (slidespub), Part 14 (slidespub), Part 15 (slidespub), Part 16 (slidespub), Part 17 (slidespub), Part 18 (slidespub), Part 19 (slidespub), Part 20 (slidespub), Part 21 (slidespub), Part 22 (slidespub)

Worksheets on Google Docs:
Part 1 (drivedocspub), Part 2 (drivedocspub), Part 3 (drivedocspub), Part 4 (docs, pub), Part 5 (docs, pub), Part 6 (docs, pub), Part 7 (docs, pub), Part 8 (docs, pub), Part 9 (docs, pub), Part 10 (docs, pub), Part 11 (docs, pub), Part 12 (docs, pub), Part 13 (docs, pub), Part 14 (docs, pub), Part 15 (docs, pub), Part 16 (docs, pub), Part 17 (docs, pub), Part 18 (docs, pub), Part 19 (docs, pub), Part 20 (docs, pub), Part 21 (docs, pub), Part 22 (docs, pub),

These are all the worksheets I designed for the 1977 Disney Movie The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.
(The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was a combination of 3 previously released Winnie the Pooh shorts: Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree (1966), Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day (1968), and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too (1974).)

These worksheets follows the same pattern and approach as the worksheets I previously designed on Peter Pan, The Jungle Book, 101 Dalmations, and The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad.   In order to avoid repeating myself too much, I'm going to try to keep the explanation to a minimum here.

I have, however, made one major change--I've increased the difficulty of the task by increasing the number of missing words for each section from 5 to 10.  I thought my students were ready for the challenge.
(Note: I don't view this movie worksheets as vocabulary lessons.  The missing words are primarily just to force interaction with the sentences.  Therefore the missing words are selected based on how salient they are in their context, and not on how useful they are for vocabulary building.   As a result of this, the selection of words is not ideal for vocabulary acquisition: some of the words are very basic and will already be known to the learner, while others are low frequency vocabulary and not useful at this level.  Also words are often repeated between worksheets).

Showing movies in class is based on the philosophy that young learners benefit most from lots of input.  The majority of this input should be highly graded, but I think some authentic material in the classroom is not a bad thing.  (I try to limit myself to about 5 minutes of this movie at a time, so they get about 5 minutes of authentic input during a class of 2 hours.  Although, granted, by the time I've gone through all the activities surrounding this movie, it can eat up anywhere between 10-25 minutes of class time.)

Although the actual movie itself is far above the students' level, the worksheets are based off of the "grade the task not the text" philosophy, and so the intention was to make the task as easy as possible.

In the class, the movie worksheets follow these steps.
1. Students are introduced to 10 vocabulary words on PowerPoint.
2. Students read together "The Story Last Time" section on the PowerPoint
3. Students listen quietly to the section of the movie
4. Students are given the script, and fill in the missing words.
5. The movie is played again.  Students follow along with their script to check their answers.  The teacher pauses the movie after each answer is given, to ensure everyone has the right answer, and to allow weaker students to find their place in the script again.
6. After the movie finishes, final feedback is on PowerPoint.

The pictures for "The Story Last Time" Section on PowerPoint all come from this website here.
The basis for the script comes from this website here, but I also proofed it myself and I've adjusted it wherever I thought it was in error.

I used various links to online version of the movie (all of which are linked to off of the Google Slides presentations).  However, as the movie is copyrighted material, it's only a matter of time before the video is taken down, and the links become invalid.  If at all possible, it's probably best if anyone re-using these worksheets just buys the DVD.

Each movie worksheet also contains a link to a quizlet quiz.  The quizlet quiz reviews all of the vocabulary covered up until that point:

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 1
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 2
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 3
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 4
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 5
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 6
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 7
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 8
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 9
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 10
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 11
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 12
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 13
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 14
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 15
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 16
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 17
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 18
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 19
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 20
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 21
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Part 22

Addendums
I tried to limit myself to only 4 pages for each class (which comes out to 2 pieces of paper when photocopied double-sided).  There was one exception, however.  Part 19 is 5 pages long.  This was a simple mistake on my part, but I only realized the mistake after the worksheet was finished.  And so, for that one part only, I just allowed myself an extra sheet.