Saturday, October 31, 2015

Qualities for each job: practice adjectives and nouns for describing personality

(TESOL Worksheets--adjectives)
[This is an activity meant as a follow-up to my previous lesson on practicing nouns and adjectives for describing personality.
In this activity, first I show the students jobs on PowerPoint (Google: Drive, Slides, Pub).  Then, in their groups, they have to decide on three qualities necessary for each job. (Google: Drive, Docs, Pub)
Then, in new groups, they have to say which of their classmates would be best for each job, and why. (Google: Drive, Docs, Pub).]


Think of 3 qualities for each of these people:

1. zookeeper _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

2. doctor _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

3. police officer _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

4. teacher _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

5.nurse _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

6. shop clerk _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

7. door to door salesman _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

8. chef _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

9. boss _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

10. thief _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

11. king _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

12. rock star _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

13. farmer _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

14. flight attendant _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

15. preacher _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

16. samurai _________________________, _________________________, _________________________


17. artist _________________________, _________________________, _________________________

1. _________________________ would make the best zookeeper because:


2. _________________________ would make the best doctor because:


3. _________________________ would make the best police officer because:


4. _________________________ would make the best teacher because:


5. _________________________ would make the best nurse  because:


6. _________________________ would make the best shop clerk because:


7. _________________________ would make the best door to door salesman because:


8. _________________________ would make the best chef because:


9. _________________________ would make the best boss because:


10. _________________________ would make the best thief because:


11. _________________________ would make the best king because:


12. _________________________ would make the best rock star because:


13. _________________________ would make the best farmer because:


14. _________________________ would make the best flight attendant because:


15. _________________________ would make the best preacher because:


16. _________________________ would make the best samurai because:


17. _________________________ would make the best artist  because:



Friday, October 30, 2015

Speaking for Pre-Intermediate Students--Topics about daily life--Speed Dating

(TESOL Worksheets--Speaking)
Google: Drive, Docs, Pub
[I made this to review for a speaking test for my pre-intermediate students, but I think it can stand as an independent activity, so I'm posting it here.
It's a series of cards asking students to talk for 2-3 minutes about something in their daily life.
I did this as a speed dating activity in my class.  The students form two circles.  I time them for 3 minutes.  After 3 minutes, the students in the inner circle move one chair to their left.]


With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
What subjects do you study at school?  Which do you find the most difficult?  (If you have graduated from school, talk about which subjects you used to study.)

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
Tell me about your job.  What does it involve?  Why did you choose that job?  (If you are still in school, talk about which job you would like to have after you graduate.)
With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
What do you do in your free time?  Do you have any hobbies or interests?  What are they?  How did you get into them?

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
What do you usually eat for dinner?  Do you usually cook yourself?  If no, how do you usually get your food? 

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
What do you do at night?  (The last 2 or 3 hours before you go to sleep.)  Describe your nightly habits to your partner.

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
What is your morning routine?  From the moment you wake up, to the time you leave the house, what do you usually do every morning?

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
How many days off do you usually have during the week?  What do you do in your days off?

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
Describe your journey to work/school.  How do you get to work?  What kinds of things do you see every day on the way to work?  Are there any difficulties?

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
Talk about your room.  Describe all the objects around your room to your partner.

With a partner, talk for 2-3 minutes about:
Talk about your favorite movie.  Describe it as much as possible.  (Don’t just say what the name is: say who the characters are, what the story is, and how the movie made you feel.).



Thursday, October 29, 2015

Subject Object Pronouns--Doraemon PowerPoint Game

(TESOL Worksheets--pronouns)
So, once-again, here is a PowerPoint game in which I can take no credit for the template or the questions, but I just want to preserve my work of filling in the boxes.
One of my co-workers recently downloaded a number of these PowerPoint templates from the Internet.  (Apparently they come mostly from English Teachers working in South Korea.)  This one is credited to Kyle Ludeke.
Most of the questions for this are also not mine--of the 26 questions, 20 are taken from a PowerPoint another co-worker of mine had set up.  I just make the last 6 up myself to fill up the game.  Google: Drive, Slides, Pub, and embedded below.



Wednesday, October 28, 2015

IELTS Speaking Test: Part 2 or Part 3?

(TESOL Worksheets--IELTS Speaking)
Google: Drive, Docs, Pub
[This is a quick little warm-up worksheet that I use to familiarize students about the differences between part 2 and part 3 of the IELTS speaking test.  I do this as a lead-in to a unit of the textbook (IELTS Express) that practices both part 2 and part 3 in the same lesson. The answers are on the PowerPoint--Google: Drive, Slides, Pub.]

Here are some possible IELTS speaking questions.  Would you encounter these on part 2 or part 3 of the speaking exam?

Match the words to the blanks
part 2, part 3

Describe a movie you saw recently:___________________________

How do you think movies have affected society? __________________

Have people become too dependent on email these days? ____________

Describe an e-mail you sent or received recently:___________________

Describe one of your favourite childhood memories: ________________

How has childhood changed in the modern world? _________________

Describe a book that you are currently reading: ___________________

In the age of computers, is reading still an important skill? ___________

Describe a museum that you went to: ___________________________

What are the benefits to a city of maintaining local museums? ________

In schools, how much of the student’s success is dependent on the teacher, and how much of it is dependent on the student? ____________


Describe a teacher who had a great influence on you: ______________


Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Using Movies in TESOL Classrooms: Why the Students Should Never Pick the Movie

(TESOL ideas--showing movies in the classroom)

This post has two purposes--one is a follow up to the previous post on my experience using The Fast and the Furious 7, and to describe why this movie has convinced me that it's a terrible idea to let the students pick the movie.

But I also want to talk in general about the popular TESOL idea that the students, rather than the teacher, should pick the movie.  (Something I've often heard people say.)

I used to be sympathetic to this idea.  However, my experience with The Fast and the Furious 7 has convinced me that the students should never again be allowed to pick the movie.  The teacher should pick the movie.  Or possibly the teacher should allow students to vote on a movie from a limited selection of choices that the teacher has pre-approved.

But never again will I ever say to my classes: "Guys, we can do whatever movie you want.  Just tell me what you're interested in."

My reasons are as follows:

1). Students pick stupid movies
It's tempting to just write off my experience with The Fast and the Furious 7 as just a one time fluke, but honestly, now that I think back over all the movies that my students have pleaded with me to do over the years, the vast majority of them have been inappropriate or stupid--cheesy romance movies, dumb action movies, or horror movies always seem to top the list of requests.

2). Students pick movies which are inappropriate for their level
So, students have no idea what movies are good for their level or not.  They're attracted to the show and spectacle of big budget Hollywood action movies, but have not really thought about how all the military language and vocabulary that is usually emphasized in these movies is totally useless for their daily English conversation.

3). Students always pick movies they've already seen
So, the teacher asks the class what movie they want to see.  What are the students going to pick?  Obviously not some movie they've never heard of.  How could they?  So they'll just resort to whatever movie is most recent in their memory, and pick whatever dumb blockbuster Hollywood came out with that year.
And what's the fun in that?  Of course they're going to be immediately bored with the movie, because they've already seen it.
Also, the memories of young people are very short.  Working with teenagers in Cambodia and Vietnam, I've discovered that they're more or less oblivious to any movie that is more than 3 years old.  So if you let them choose the movie just from their limited memory selection, you're going to be limited to just the movies that came out in the past couple years.
The teacher has a much better knowledge of the available selection of English movies.

4). The students can't all agree on the same movie
So, TESOL teachers often will say things like, "Make sure the movie is something the students are interested in, and not just something the teacher is interested in."  Or, "the students should always have control over the movie."  (Both phrases I've heard around the staffroom.)
But this is ridiculous.  It's as if the students were one big monolithic entity that all had the same taste in movies.
If you get 20 different students in the room, they're all going to have 20 different opinions on movies.  Do you think you're going to get a movie that will keep all 20 of them happy?
And this leads to the next problem.

5). The Tyranny of the Majority
So, since it's impossible to let the students pick the movie as if "the students" were just one monolithic entity, you end up just having to have a vote and going with the majority view.  (Actually I say "majority", but really you never get a clear majority.  You have to go with a plurality.  It's a tyranny of the plurality.)
So then you have one movie that some of the students like, but many of them don't.  Which leads to the next problem...

6). Students are willing to put up with a movie they dislike if they view it as coming from the teacher, but they are unwilling to put up with a movie they dislike if it is selected by their classmates.
If the teacher chooses the movie, the students will view it as coming from an authority source.  And they'll usually accept it.  They usually trust and respect the teacher.  But they don't trust their classmates to choose a movie.  If their classmates have chosen a movie they dislike, then they'll complain about it and agitate for a different movie.  Which is what happened to me with The Fast and the Furious 7.  We only got 20 minutes into the movie, and then half the class started to become vocal about their desire to change the movie.

7). The teacher needs to understand the movie in order to create materials for it.
I discovered this when I was working on The Fast and the Furious 7.  It's one of those movies where the soundtrack dominates the opening scenes, and I was trying to transcribe the words for my students, but I couldn't because I was completely unfamiliar with these songs, and had no idea what they were saying.
It was also difficult for me to keep track of these characters.  I used Wikipedia and IMDB to try to keep track of these characters, but I still had to resort to occasionally just labeling some characters "girl in pink" or "race girl".

8). The teacher needs to be engaged with the movie for the teacher's own sanity
So, putting together movie worksheets is like anything in life--it's easy to throw something together slapdash, but to do it well takes time.  And if the teacher completely hates the movie they're working on, they're not going to put a lot of time into trying to get the movie script exactly right.  If the teacher is creating materials for the movie, it's important that it's a movie the teacher won't mind spending a lot of time with.

Monday, October 26, 2015

The Fast and the Furious 7 Movie Worksheets: Unfinished

(Movie Worksheets)

So, there's this theory in TESOL that, whenever possible, the students should pick the material, and not the teacher.  It's more democratic, it gives the students a feeling of control over their own learning, and, most importantly, it makes them more engaged with the material.

Especially when dealing with materials designed to give input--like watching movies or graded readers--it's important that the students are engaged with the material. If they are bored or not interested in the movie, they won't have any motivation to try to understand the language.  Their brains will just switch off, and the words will simply wash over them.  (Like many of us listening to the sermon in church as kids after your brain has switched off and you start counting the bricks behind the preacher--technically you're still hearing the words, but for all the good the input is doing you, you might as well be just listening to crickets.)

Conversely, if the students are engaged and interested in the movie, they'll have a lot of motivation to want to understand all the things the characters are saying.

This is the problem when the teacher brings in a movie that is interesting to the teacher.  There's no guarantee that it will be interesting to the students, and then the students will switch their brains off and not benefit from any of the input.

At least, that's the theory...

My thinking on this has drastically changed over the last few weeks.  After attempting to do The Fast and the Furious 7 with my Elementary class, I will never again let the students pick the movie.  In the future, I might pre-select 4 movies I think are appropriate, and let them vote from my selection.  But never again will I say something like: "Listen, guys, we can do any movie you want.  What movie do you want to watch?  Anything's okay."

The Fast and the Furious 7 is a exactly what happens when you tell students that they can choose any movie they like.
I'll describe my thoughts on this in more detail in tomorrow's post--which I'm planning on calling: Why Students Should Never Pick the Movie--[update: that post is here]--but the short version is that I told the students they could pick any movie they wanted.  First, the students brainstormed all the movie they were interested in, and I put all the titles up on the whiteboard.  Then we had a vote on which of these movies they wanted to do in class, and The Fast and the Furious 7 was the overwhelming winner.

I had never seen this movie before, but I took an immediate disliking to it.  Every day when I would prepare the worksheets before class, I would just roll my eyes and think, "This is the stupidest thing I've ever seen."  But what did my opinion matter?  It was the students who needed to be engaged with it.

But then, after 6 lessons, some of the students told me they hated the movie and wanted to change it.  So we had another big class discussion, and another vote, and changed the movie.
As a result, this project is unfinished, and  I've only got worksheets made out for the first 20 minutes of the movie.  But I'm posting them here for whatever they may or may not be worth.

In my opinion, this movie was completely inappropriate for my class of elementary students.  It was the 7th movie in a series, and started out assuming familiarity with the characters.  The first 20 minutes we saw consisted just of a long re-introduction to all the characters, without really moving the plot anywhere. (There was something about a bad guy going around causing trouble, but no real plot to speak of.)  The dialogue was terrible.  (It sounded like a very white suburban screen writer trying to imagine how urban people talked).  And the difficulty level of the language was completely inappropriate for my Elementary students.  Plus, there were long sections were there was no language input (fight scenes, car races).

I watched only as much of this movie as I had to in order to prepare the worksheets in advance of the class.  So I haven't seen any more than the 20 minutes covered by these worksheets.  So I can't give this movie a review on my movie review project.  But I've got to say, based on what little I saw, I'm pretty sure this movie was heading for a one-star rating.
[Also, sidenote:  when I read Crash by J.G. Ballard, I assumed that his novel about people who get sexually aroused by car crashes was only meant as a metaphor for society's obsession with cars.  Watching these Fast and the Furious movies, however, it's apparent that for a some people (namely the makers of these films, and their target audience) there is definitely some sort of connection between high speed car racing and sex.  I made this point way back in my review of The Fast and the Furious 3, but it struck me immediately again in this movie--whenever there's any scenes of cars racing at at unsafe speeds, they are always accompanied by scantily clad girls in sexy poses.]

Below are all my worksheets and PowerPoint presentations for this movie.
I've been changing my approach yet again, and I've decided that students benefit most from getting the whole script of the movie in front of them, even if they don't understand all of it.  However, the actual task should be as easier as possible.

For the task, I gave the students 5 vocabulary words before the movie (on PowerPoint).  Then we watched the movie.  Then I gave them the script, and they had to match the 5 words to the blank.  Then I played the movie again, and they checked their answers.  (During the checking the answers stage, I also paused the movie after each answer, and confirmed that the class had gotten it right.)  I used an online script [LINK HERE] as my base when preparing these worksheets, but I also would listen to the movie beforehand to double check the script, and I made a lot of adjustments where there were mistakes or gaps.

The PowerPoints I used for this movie are all on Google: Part 1: Drive, Slides, Pub, Part 2: drive, slides, pub,  Part 3: drive, slides, pub, Part 4: drive, slides, pub, Part 5: drive, slides, pub and Part 6: drive, slides, pub.
The worksheets are also on Google Docs: Part 1: drive, docs, pub, Part 2: drive, docs, pub, Part 3: drive, docs, pub, Part 4: drive, docs, pub, Part 5: drive, docs, pub and Part 6: drive, docs, pub.

























Match these words to the blanks:
invented, kids, taking, ride, settle


Deckard Shaw: They say if you want a glimpse of the future, just look behind you.  I used to think that was bollocks.  Now I realize, you can't outrun the past. When we were (1) __________________, you'd start fights with the toughest bastards in the yard. But I was the one, who had to step in and finish them. Rest now, little brother, while I (2)__________________ your one last score. Take care of my brother. Anything happens to him, I'll come back looking for you.

song: War for war, bodies that hit the ground, You ready for us, cuz it’s about to go down, Push em to the left, push em to the right, Ah, Load them choppers up, hit em on sight, Ah, I ain’t never ran from a gunfight, This is you and me,  Mano Y Mano you’re damn right. You take one, I take one, You can’t hide you can’t run,

Deckard Shaw: Here.  Hold this.  (Song: Too late to turn back, This is the payback.)

Song: Don’t act like you don’t know, Know what I came for, Too late to turn back, This is the payback, You take one, I take one, You can’t hide you can’t run, Too late to turn back, This is the payback

Song:  It’s the gang!  You can't be riding foreign shit Off-set, Car ain't even out yet, Bit too long clip, you know you ain't 'bout that, Bankroll mafia, can't believe you bought that, Automatic long clip, you know you ain't 'bout that.  It’s the gang!  Make play, Still get money out the bitches, Every ho look away, catch whiplash, Still got the K in the whip stashed

Letty Ortiz: Come on, Dom, so where are you (3) __________________ me?

Dominic Toretto: They say an open road helps you think, about where you've been, where you're going. So you don't remember any of this yet?

Letty Ortiz:  It's not fair. You know I don't. So what is it exactly that you're trying to show me?

Dominic Toretto:  That. Race Wars.

Letty Ortiz: We used to come here?

Dominic Toretto: Come here? We (4) __________________ it.

Dominic Toretto: Keep it under 9000 RPMs. Kid's gonna fire his pistons after the first 200.

Letty Ortiz:  You know that's not my style. I got to ride or die, right?

Dominic Toretto: How about you just (5) __________________ on this one?

Match the same words to the blanks:



__________________ to design or create something that has never existed before

__________________ to travel by car

__________________ you solve the problem and stop arguing

__________________ a child

__________________ to go somewhere with someone, often paying for them or being responsible for them
answers:

you.  I used to think that was bollocks.  Now I realize, you can't outrun the past. When we were (1)kids, you'd start fights with the toughest bastards in the yard. But I was the one, who had to step in and finish them. Rest now, little brother, while I (2)settle your one last score. Take care of my brother. Anything happens to him, I'll come back looking for you.

song: War for war, bodies that hit the ground, You ready for us, cuz it’s about to go down, Push em to the left, push em to the right, Ah, Load them choppers up, hit em on sight, Ah, I ain’t never ran from a gunfight, This is you and me,  Mano Y Mano you’re damn right. You take one, I take one, You can’t hide you can’t run,

Deckard Shaw: Here.  Hold this.  (Song: Too late to turn back, This is the payback.)

Song: Don’t act like you don’t know, Know what I came for, Too late to turn back, This is the payback, You take one, I take one, You can’t hide you can’t run, Too late to turn back, This is the payback

Song:  It’s the gang!  You can't be riding foreign shit Off-set, Car ain't even out yet, Bit too long clip, you know you ain't 'bout that, Bankroll mafia, can't believe you bought that, Automatic long clip, you know you ain't 'bout that.  It’s the gang!  Make play, Still get money out the bitches, Every ho look away, catch whiplash, Still got the K in the whip stashed

Letty Ortiz: Come on, Dom, so where are you (3)taking me?

Dominic Toretto: They say an open road helps you think, about where you've been, where you're going. So you don't remember any of this yet?

Letty Ortiz:  It's not fair. You know I don't. So what is it exactly that you're trying to show me?

Dominic Toretto:  That. Race Wars.

Letty Ortiz: We used to come here?

Dominic Toretto: Come here? We (4)invented it.

Dominic Toretto: Keep it under 9000 RPMs. Kid's gonna fire his pistons after the first 200.

Letty Ortiz:  You know that's not my style. I got to ride or die, right?

Dominic Toretto: How about you just (5)ride on this one?

Match the same words to the blanks:



invent  to design or create something that has never existed before

ride to travel by car

settle you solve the problem and stop arguing

kid a child

take to go somewhere with someone, often paying for them or being responsible for them


Match the words to the blanks
appreciate, date, memories, minivan, punch

Race Girl: Are you ready?  I know you're ready!  Go!

Crowd: Nice job!

girl in pink: Hey! That's the girl I heard so much about.  Where you been at, ghost girl?

Hector: Letty, what the hell? Huh? Damn, Dom! Your girl's still got that swing, homie.

Dominic Toretto:  You never could take a (1)_______________.

Hector: Right, right.  Hey, man, I'm glad you're back, man.  It's good to see you.

Dominic Toretto:  Good to see you, Hector.

Brian O'Conner: Alright. We made it, Jack.

Jack: Yeah, we made it! 

Brian O'Conner:  Yeah, we made it. I just gotta find that door button. Buddy where's the door button at? Do you know?

Woman: Hey.

Brian O'Conner:  Hey. Yeah, of course. I'm new to this.

Woman: Yeah, you don't seem like the (2) _______________ type.

Brian O'Conner: No, not exactly. Hey buddy you didn't give me a high-five? Wait, wait, wait. Wait. High-five! All right! Yeah, buddy. (3)_______________ it, thank you.

Woman: Don't worry, you'll get used to this in no time.

Brian O'Conner: Yeah, that's what I'm afraid of.

Letty Ortiz:  First time I saw this, I thought it was kind of funny.  I guess now, the joke's on me.  What are you doing?

Dominic Toretto:  What I should've done a long time ago.

Letty Ortiz:  Stop it! Look at it. It's the truth. That's the date that I lost my memory. That's the (4) _______________ that Letty died. And I was born.

Dominic Toretto:  No. You never died.

Letty Ortiz:  Do you know how hard it is for me when you look at me? And you see me through 15 years of (5) _______________?  Every beautiful moment we've ever had—I see it in your eyes. I can't give that to you. I got nothing.

Dominic Toretto:  You got me.

Letty Ortiz:  And you've got only a piece of me. I have to find myself. For me. Goodbye, Dom.

_______________a particular day of the month or year

_______________ to feel grateful for something

_______________ a large, high car that can carry more people than a normal car.  It’s normally considered the ideal car for families or parents with lots of children.

_______________ a forceful hit with a fist (=closed hand)

_______________ something that you remember from the past


Answers:

Race Girl: Are you ready?  I know you're ready!  Go!

Crowd: Nice job!

girl in pink: Hey! That's the girl I heard so much about.  Where you been at, ghost girl?

Hector: Letty, what the hell? Huh? Damn, Dom! Your girl's still got that swing, homie.

Dominic Toretto:  You never could take a (1)punch.

Hector: Right, right.  Hey, man, I'm glad you're back, man.  It's good to see you.

Dominic Toretto:  Good to see you, Hector.

Brian O'Conner: Alright. We made it, Jack.

Jack: Yeah, we made it! 

Brian O'Conner:  Yeah, we made it. I just gotta find that door button. Buddy where's the door button at? Do you know?

Woman: Hey.

Brian O'Conner:  Hey. Yeah, of course. I'm new to this.

Woman: Yeah, you don't seem like the (2)minivan type.

Brian O'Conner: No, not exactly. Hey buddy you didn't give me a high-five? Wait, wait, wait. Wait. High-five! All right! Yeah, buddy. (3)Appreciate it, thank you.

Woman: Don't worry, you'll get used to this in no time.

Brian O'Conner: Yeah, that's what I'm afraid of.

Letty Ortiz:  First time I saw this, I thought it was kind of funny.  I guess now, the joke's on me.  What are you doing?

Dominic Toretto:  What I should've done a long time ago.

Letty Ortiz:  Stop it! Look at it. It's the truth. That's the date that I lost my memory. That's the (4)date that Letty died. And I was born.

Dominic Toretto:  No. You never died.

Letty Ortiz:  Do you know how hard it is for me when you look at me? And you see me through 15 years of (5)memories?  Every beautiful moment we've ever had—I see it in your eyes. I can't give that to you. I got nothing.

Dominic Toretto:  You got me.

Letty Ortiz:  And you've got only a piece of me. I have to find myself. For me. Goodbye, Dom.

date a particular day of the month or year

appreciate to feel grateful for something

minivan a large, high car that can carry more people than a normal car.  It’s normally considered the ideal car for families or parents with lots of children.

punch a forceful hit with a fist (=closed hand)

memory something that you remember from the past

Match the words to the space
ain’t, arrest, boss, liar, wanna

Elena Neves: You're disappointed, aren't you?

Luke Hobbs: What are you talking about?

Elena Neves: The last arrest.  It was too easy. Target didn't even run.

Luke Hobbs:  Ah, it's okay. Gives me a chance to hit the iron. Also, lets me work on my stamping skills.

Elena Neves: You're a terrible liar. See you tomorrow, (1)______________.

Luke Hobbs:  I'll see you then.

Elena Neves: Don't stay too late.

Luke Hobbs:  I'll stay as long as I want, woman.

Elena Neves: I knew you would say that.

Luke Hobbs:  Elena?

Elena Neves: What's this?

Luke Hobbs:  It's the letter of recommendation you asked for. And just know I meant every word in there.

Elena Neves: Thanks, Hobbs. Thanks for everything.

Luke Hobbs:  Come on, way too sentimental right now.  Get home. Good night.

Elena Neves: Okay. Bye.

Deckard Shaw: Just one sec.

Luke Hobbs:  You sure as hell (2) ______________ the IT guy, so you better start talking, before I break that finger, six different ways, and stick it right where the sun doesn't shine.

Deckard Shaw:  Agent Hobbs, right?

Luke Hobbs:  That's right. I'm also the last man on Earth whose computer you (3) ______________ be hacking into. You just earned yourself a dance with the devil, boy. You're under (4) ______________.

Deckard Shaw:  Like I said, I'm here for the team that crippled my brother.

Luke Hobbs: There ain't no goddamn team. It was just one man, and he's standing right in front of you.

Deckard Shaw:  The lady was right.  You are a terrible (5) ______________.

They fight, and fight, and fight, and fight and fight.  Fight fight fight, fight fight fight.

Luke Hobbs: Goddamn IT guys.

Elena Neves: Hobbs!

Luke Hobbs:  On me!
fight fight fight.
Luke Hobbs:  Elena!

Elena Neves: Hobbs? Hobbs!

______________ Short for: am not, is not, are not, have not, or has not. This word is informal English.  (It’s used in the street, but not in the classroom).  Many people consider it not correct or not polite, but it is still widely used in informal spoken English.

______________ someone who tells lies

______________ someone who is responsible for employees and tells them what to do

______________ The police take someone away to ask them about a crime that they might have committed

______________ short form of “want to”  This word is informal English.
Answers:


Elena Neves: You're disappointed, aren't you?

Luke Hobbs: What are you talking about?

Elena Neves: The last arrest.  It was too easy. Target didn't even run.

Luke Hobbs:  Ah, it's okay. Gives me a chance to hit the iron. Also, lets me work on my stamping skills.

Elena Neves: You're a terrible liar. See you tomorrow, (1)boss.

Luke Hobbs:  I'll see you then.

Elena Neves: Don't stay too late.

Luke Hobbs:  I'll stay as long as I want, woman.

Elena Neves: I knew you would say that.

Luke Hobbs:  Elena?

Elena Neves: What's this?

Luke Hobbs:  It's the letter of recommendation you asked for. And just know I meant every word in there.

Elena Neves: Thanks, Hobbs. Thanks for everything.

Luke Hobbs:  Come on, way too sentimental right now.  Get home. Good night.

Elena Neves: Okay. Bye.

Deckard Shaw: Just one sec.

Luke Hobbs:  You sure as hell (2)ain't the IT guy, so you better start talking, before I break that finger, six different ways, and stick it right where the sun doesn't shine.

Deckard Shaw:  Agent Hobbs, right?

Luke Hobbs:  That's right. I'm also the last man on Earth whose computer you (3)wanna be hacking into. You just earned yourself a dance with the devil, boy. You're under (4)arrest.

Deckard Shaw:  Like I said, I'm here for the team that crippled my brother.

Luke Hobbs: There ain't no goddamn team. It was just one man, and he's standing right in front of you.

Deckard Shaw:  The lady was right.  You are a terrible (5)liar.

They fight, and fight, and fight, and fight and fight.  Fight fight fight, fight fight fight.

Luke Hobbs: Goddamn IT guys.

Elena Neves: Hobbs!

Luke Hobbs:  On me!
fight fight fight.
Luke Hobbs:  Elena!

Elena Neves: Hobbs? Hobbs!

ain’t  Short for: am not, is not, are not, have not, or has not. This word is informal English.  (It’s used in the street, but not in the classroom).  Many people consider it not correct or not polite, but it is still widely used in informal spoken English.

liar someone who tells lies

boss  someone who is responsible for employees and tells them what to do

arrest The police take someone away to ask them about a crime that they might have committed

wanna  short form of “want to”  This word is informal English.

Match the words to the sentences
bullets, disappointed, miss, package, settle

Jack: Vroom. Vroom. Vroom. Vroom

Brian O'Conner: Alright buddy, we gotta go or we'll be late. Uh, Come on. Okay, uhh. What do you think? Parking brake slide right up to the school?

Jack: Where's mommy?

Brian O'Conner: I don't know. She's up there. She's coming.

Jack: Oh. I know.

Brian O'Conner:  Here you go.  Raa!  Watch your head.

Mia: Dom, you have a (1) ________________________ out here. From Tokyo.

Dominic Toretto: Tokyo? What's Han trying to convert me over to a turbo charger?

Brian O'Conner:  Alright.  You ready? There we go.

Jack: Yeah!

Brian O'Conner:  Hey buddy, cars don't fly.

Jack: Hey, cars don't fly.

Brian O'Conner:  This one did, huh?

Dominic Toretto: Brian in a minivan. Things have changed.

Mia:  He's struggling, Dom. He doesn't want me to see it, but the white picket fence is like an anchor on him. I can tell. I tried to talk to him the other night, and do you know what he said? He doesn't (2) ________________________ the girls. He doesn't miss the cars. He misses the (3) ________________________. Can you believe that?

Dominic Toretto:  Let him (4) ________________________ in. Give him time.

Mia: How does nine months sound? I'm having another baby.

Dominic Toretto:  And you didn't tell him, did you?

Brian O'Conner (talking to Jack in the background):  Alright, Here we go. We’re racing.  Are you ready?

Dominic Toretto: You gotta tell him.

Brian O'Conner(talking to Jack in the background): You sure? Alright, good.

Mia: I don't want him to be disappointed with this life.

Brian O'Conner(talking to Jack in the background):  I think I’m ready too.

Mia: With me.

Dominic Toretto:  He will never be (5) ________________________ with you. You're the best thing that's ever happened to him.

Mia: Thank you.

Dominic Toretto: Yeah?

Deckard Shaw: Dominic Toretto. You don't know me. You're about to.

Dominic Toretto: Get down!

Mia: Jack! Jack!

________________________ unhappy because someone or something was not as good as you hoped or expected

________________________ an object wrapped in paper in order to be sent by post

________________________ to relax into a comfortable position

________________________ to feel sad that a person or thing is not present

________________________ small, metal objects that are shot from a gun


Answers:

Jack: Vroom. Vroom. Vroom. Vroom

Brian O'Conner: Alright buddy, we gotta go or we'll be late. Uh, Come on. Okay, uhh. What do you think? Parking brake slide right up to the school?

Jack: Where's mommy?

Brian O'Conner: I don't know. She's up there. She's coming.

Jack: Oh. I know.

Brian O'Conner:  Here you go.  Raa!  Watch your head.

Mia: Dom, you have a (1)package out here. From Tokyo.

Dominic Toretto: Tokyo? What's Han trying to convert me over to a turbo charger?

Brian O'Conner:  Alright.  You ready? There we go.

Jack: Yeah!

Brian O'Conner:  Hey buddy, cars don't fly.

Jack: Hey, cars don't fly.

Brian O'Conner:  This one did, huh?

Dominic Toretto: Brian in a minivan. Things have changed.

Mia:  He's struggling, Dom. He doesn't want me to see it, but the white picket fence is like an anchor on him. I can tell. I tried to talk to him the other night, and do you know what he said? He doesn't (2)miss the girls. He doesn't miss the cars. He misses the (3)bullets. Can you believe that?

Dominic Toretto:  Let him (4)settle in. Give him time.

Mia: How does nine months sound? I'm having another baby.

Dominic Toretto:  And you didn't tell him, did you?

Brian O'Conner (talking to Jack in the background):  Alright, Here we go. We’re racing.  Are you ready?

Dominic Toretto: You gotta tell him.

Brian O'Conner(talking to Jack in the background): You sure? Alright, good.

Mia: I don't want him to be disappointed with this life.

Brian O'Conner(talking to Jack in the background):  I think I’m ready too.

Mia: With me.

Dominic Toretto:  He will never be (5)disappointed with you. You're the best thing that's ever happened to him.

Mia: Thank you.

Dominic Toretto: Yeah?

Deckard Shaw: Dominic Toretto. You don't know me. You're about to.

Dominic Toretto: Get down!

Mia: Jack! Jack!

disappointed unhappy because someone or something was not as good as you hoped or expected

package an object wrapped in paper in order to be sent by post

settle to become used to a new way of life

miss  to feel sad that a person or thing is not present

bullets  small, metal objects that are shot from a gun

Match the words to the sentences
70s, doubt, honey, introduce, watch your mouth

Elena Neves:  Shattered his collarbone, fractured his leg in two places. He only regained consciousness this morning. First thing he said was, "Get me Dom". He's in there.

Dominic Toretto: You okay?

Elena Neves: I'm fine. He's waiting. Let's go. Got something for you. Your files.

Luke Hobbs: Thank you.

Dominic Toretto: You risk life and limb to save the free world, and what do they give you? Jell-O and a bad (1)____________ TV show.

Luke Hobbs: You know, it's got its perks. Sponge baths ain't that bad.

Samantha: Dad!

Luke Hobbs: Ah, I'm sorry, baby.

Dominic Toretto: "Dad"?

Luke Hobbs: Honey, I want to (2)____________ you to somebody. He's a, uhh...He's an old friend. Go on and say hello.

Samantha: Dominic Toretto, right? My dad said, he kicked your ass once.

Luke Hobbs: Young lady, (3) ____________.

Dominic Toretto: Your dad’s on heavy pain meds.  I can understand if his history is a little hazy.

Samantha: I (4) ____________ it.

Luke Hobbs: Alright (5) ____________, that’s enough.  I want you to go get something to eat with Elena, while me and Toretto have a talk.  Hear me?

Elena Neves:  Come on lady, let’s get some cookies.

Luke Hobbs: And watch your mouth.

______________________ Short form of “1970s”.  An adjective used to describe anything from the years 1970-1979

______________________ a name that you call someone you love or like very much

______________________ Be careful about what you say. This is something parents say to children when the children use bad words.

______________________ To not believe in something

______________________ to tell someone another person's name the first time that they meet


Answers
Elena Neves:  Shattered his collarbone, fractured his leg in two places. He only regained consciousness this morning. First thing he said was, "Get me Dom". He's in there.

Dominic Toretto: You okay?

Elena Neves: I'm fine. He's waiting. Let's go. Got something for you. Your files.

Luke Hobbs: Thank you.

Dominic Toretto: You risk life and limb to save the free world, and what do they give you? Jell-O and a bad (1)70's TV show.

Luke Hobbs: You know, it's got its perks. Sponge baths ain't that bad.

Samantha: Dad!

Luke Hobbs: Ah, I'm sorry, baby.

Dominic Toretto: "Dad"?

Luke Hobbs: Honey, I want to (2)introduce you to somebody. He's a, uhh...He's an old friend. Go on and say hello.

Samantha: Dominic Toretto, right? My dad said, he kicked your ass once.

Luke Hobbs: Young lady, (3)watch your mouth.

Dominic Toretto: Your dad’s on heavy pain meds.  I can understand if his history is a little hazy.

Samantha: I (4)doubt it.

Luke Hobbs: Alright (5)honey, that’s enough.  I want you to go get something to eat with Elena, while me and Toretto have a talk.  Hear me?

Elena Neves:  Come on lady, let’s get some cookies.

Luke Hobbs: And watch your mouth.

1970s Short form of “1970s”.  An adjective used to describe anything from the years 1970-1979

honey a name that you call someone you love or like very much

watch your mouth Be careful about what you say. This is something parents say to children when the children use bad words.

doubt To not believe in something

introduce to tell someone another person's name the first time that they meet

assassin, down, liability, official, stand down, tore

Dominic Toretto: Who did this?

Luke Hobbs: You remember Owen Shaw? The one we (1)___________ half of London (2)___________  trying to get. Well, This is his big, bad brother. Take a look at this.

Dominic Toretto: Deckard Shaw

Luke Hobbs: British Special Forces (3)___________. The kind of unique asset that no government would ever admit to employing.

Dominic Toretto: Black Ops boys.

Luke Hobbs: Worse. They created a monster. They felt Shaw was a necessary evil until eventually they decided he was unnecessary. The powers that be felt that he knew just a little bit too much. The asset became a (4)___________. So they sent in 20 elite operatives to retire him.

Dominic Toretto: And they missed.

Luke Hobbs: That was 6 years ago and Shaw's been a ghost ever since.

Dominic Toretto: Until now. How do I find him?

Luke Hobbs: The (5)___________  answer is: you don't.

Dominic Toretto: He killed Han. Almost killed my family.

Luke Hobbs: He also tried to put me in a body bag, too. Which is why when I get out, I'm gonna put a hurt on him so bad he's gonna wish his mother had kept her legs closed. But until then, my official answer to you is (6) ___________.

Dominic Toretto: Now you know I can't do that.

Luke Hobbs: I do know you, Dom. Which is why now I give you a brother to brother answer. You do whatever it is you gotta do. When you find that son of a bitch, just do me one favor.

Dominic Toretto: What's that?

Luke Hobbs: Don't miss.

___________  agreed to or arranged by people in positions of authority

___________: someone who kills a famous or important person, usually for political reasons or in exchange for money

___________ to intentionally destroy a building or other structure because it is not being used or it is not wanted any more


___________: something or someone that causes you a lot of trouble, often when that thing or person should be helping you

___________ to stop your work (particularly used in the army as a way to tell soldiers to stop fighting)

___________ past tense of “tear (something) down”


Answers:


Dominic Toretto: Who did this?

Luke Hobbs: You remember Owen Shaw? The one we (1)tore half of London (2)down trying to get. Well, This is his big, bad brother. Take a look at this.

Dominic Toretto: Deckard Shaw

Luke Hobbs: British Special Forces (3)assassin. The kind of unique asset that no government would ever admit to employing.

Dominic Toretto: Black Ops boys.

Luke Hobbs: Worse. They created a monster. They felt Shaw was a necessary evil until eventually they decided he was unnecessary. The powers that be felt that he knew just a little bit too much. The asset became a (4)liability. So they sent in 20 elite operatives to retire him.

Dominic Toretto: And they missed.

Luke Hobbs: That was 6 years ago and Shaw's been a ghost ever since.

Dominic Toretto: Until now. How do I find him?

Luke Hobbs: The (5)official answer is: you don't.

Dominic Toretto: He killed Han. Almost killed my family.

Luke Hobbs: He also tried to put me in a body bag, too. Which is why when I get out, I'm gonna put a hurt on him so bad he's gonna wish his mother had kept her legs closed. But until then, my official answer to you is (6)stand down.

Dominic Toretto: Now you know I can't do that.

Luke Hobbs: I do know you, Dom. Which is why now I give you a brother to brother answer. You do whatever it is you gotta do. When you find that son of a bitch, just do me one favor.

Dominic Toretto: What's that?

Luke Hobbs: Don't miss.

official agreed to or arranged by people in positions of authority

assassin: someone who kills a famous or important person, usually for political reasons or in exchange for money

tear (something) down to intentionally destroy a building or other structure because it is not being used or it is not wanted any more


liability: something or someone that causes you a lot of trouble, often when that thing or person should be helping you

stand down to stop your work (particularly used in the army as a way to tell soldiers to stop fighting)

tore (something) down  past tense of “tear (something) down”